TiVo Coming To Cox

Dave Zatz —  August 24, 2006 — 9 Comments

TiVo always implied they wanted to be a software and services company rather than a hardware manufacturer. Not only do deals with Comcast, DirecTV, and now Cox further those goals, they ensure TiVo’s business viability in the face of OCAP of SDV. As with Comcast’s Motorola 6412 boxes, TiVo software will be a download option for select Cox DVRs when available in 2007. I assume the TiVo brand name, advertising features, and patent portfolio helped secure this deal which Cox was evaluating in May.

TiVo Inc. (Nasdaq: TIVO), the creator of and a leader in television services for digital video recorders (DVR), and Cox Communications, the nation’s fourth-largest cable television company, have entered into an agreement to make TiVo’s leading DVR and interactive advertising service available to select Cox subscribers.

Under the terms of the agreement, TiVo will customize its cable software for deployment on compatible Cox DVR set-top-boxes. TiVo’s downloadable software will allow Cox to deliver the TiVo(R) service in Cox subscriber homes without replacing existing DVR boxes, and without an install appointment. In this way, current Cox DVR customers who wish to enjoy the award-winning TiVo service, can quickly and easily add the benefits of TiVo to their DVR subscription.

“We are excited to add TiVo to the portfolio of Cox entertainment services,” said Steve Necessary, vice president of video product development, Cox Communications. “Cox is committed to offering our customers the best television experience possible. Our new joint service will allow us to build on the popularity of the TiVo brand while continuing to provide our customers with the simplicity of our products and the award winning customer service they have come to expect.”

Cox Digital Cable customers with DVR service who choose to add TiVo to their Cox subscription will enjoy the renowned TiVo user interface as well as new innovations that link the capabilities enabled by Cox’s broadband network like On DEMAND and High Definition service, with exclusive TiVo features like Season Pass(TM) recordings, WishList(R) searches and the recently announced TiVo KidZone. KidZone gives parents an easy way to safeguard their kids from video content while also helping them discover and choose great educational and age-appropriate shows. The service is expected to launch in select Cox markets in the first half of 2007.

Tom Rogers, TiVo’s CEO, said, “We are excited to expand our presence in the cable industry by partnering with Cox, a clear leader in driving consumer adoption of the DVR. By combining Cox’s marketing prowess and top-quality customer service with TiVo’s superior technology and product offerings, we have unleashed a highly scalable way of delivering the best television viewing experience to its customers.”

The agreement also provides for Cox to distribute TiVo’s interactive advertising platform which enables an industry proven advertising solution that is seamlessly integrated with the award-winning TiVo subscriber experience. The new advertising relationship extends Cox Media’s leadership in the advanced advertising arena and further expands TiVo’s national advertising footprint. Cox Media is the advertising sales arm of Cox Communications.

Financial terms of the deal were not disclosed.

9 responses to TiVo Coming To Cox

  1. Any word on how Comcast/Cox/etc is going to support the “other” Tivo features? Meaning, will I be able to move shows from my Cox box to my Tivo?

    Heh…. cox box……it rhymes…..

    If that is supported, I’m thinking a cable company box is a cheaper solution to a Series 3.

  2. I think I would rather go this route than the Series 3.

    Well maybe I will try both.

  3. That’s very interesting. Now if they could only move as fast to get ABC HD in Connecticut.

  4. The current guide software on COX DVRs is absolutely hideous. And a horrible remote to go with it. And you’ve got a zillion keys, and they’re all commonly used:

    UP, DOWN, LEFT, RIGHT, PAGEUP, PAGEDOWN, A, B, C, SELECT, DVRLIST, GUIDE, ETC, and a number of less commonly used ones.

    Here’s to TiVo’s more logical interface.

  5. This is a HUGE plus for those of us waiting for a TiVo dual HD box, suffering through this current Cox cludge of a DVR. I will be the first on the list to get this upgrade – hell I’ll even pay a couple bucks more a month for software that actually works and doesn’t “forget” to record shows for me!

  6. Awesome… now all I need is for them to roll out the new three-tuner SA box, and it’ll totally top the Series 3 TiVo. Seriously, a two-tuner box just doesn’t cut it anymore.

    John: The Cox remote (at least here in the Fairfax, VA area) is a horrible silver-and-grey custom job. The 1st party SA AllTouch remote is a LOT better as far as layout goes. I actually bought 2 of them, and I’m much happier. Who needs an “ON DEMAND” button?

    Cliff: Yeah, I giggle every time. I also find it funny that my web server port is blocked on my Cox cable modem connection. You might say that port 80 is Cox-blocked. :D :D

  7. Ok, I guess Time Warner is up next. I guess the satellite companies are going to face an onslaught of “Switch to cable w/tivo” ads.

  8. Please, please let our DVR be one of those that receives the tivo upgrade. The current release of the Cox DVR software is horrible. The worst issue is the disk space leakage. After about a week of usage it starts deleting recordings after about 6 hours, even with only two or three hours used. We have to power cycle the box to get it to recalculate disk space.

  9. What’s worse than the DVR interface is the On Demand interface, for the love of god please hire a usability expert!

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